Red Huxley – Nothing More Review



1. One Down
2. Up In Smoke
3. Nothing More
4. My Own Way
5. Coming After You
6. Another Dead End
7. Calling Me
8. Cut Myself Loose
9. Black Hole Waiting
10. Out Of Time
11. Coming Home

Verdict: 2.5 / 5

Right on the outside of the CD case for the debut album by local rock group Red Huxley is a sticker that simply states: “Play Loud.” This isn’t the name of the album or anything to do with it; it’s purely an instruction to the listener about how best to enjoy their style of music. And I can dig that.

Red Huxley, if you do not know them, released an EP of promising material way back in 2010, and have since then been working their way around trying to build enough of a rep to get a decent full album out. A chance meeting with members of the band Eagles of Death Metal gave them the opportunity to get an album made with American assistance, and what we have now is the final product in that endeavor.

From what it sounds like in their tracks, Red Huxley believe the finest stage of rock music occurred from perhaps the late 60s to the very early 80s; and that anything outside of those parameters has failed to meet the proper version of pure Rock that is needed by an audience. Just Rock; no hyphens or additions or blending. And to have an ambition like that is admirable, in a sense. And I can definitely appreciate the high energy, hand clapping feet stomping power that comes from some of their tracks, and I can imagine these guys are amazing at live shows. However, when listened to in the comfort of one’s own home, the songs become a little same-y, with a lack of distinction between when one ends and another begins. The songs mostly fall into categories, with one being slightly Bluesier than the other, without losing its energy, which is something I appreciate.

Red Huxley has a nice idea about music and what their genre should be, and this album shows that. However, I don’t really think there’s any memorable singles to put on a playlist from this album, and that at the moment, this band is still better as a concert piece.

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