Fujifilm XF1


Model: XF1
Specifications: 12.0MP EXR CMOS Sensor
ISO 100-12800
4x Optical Zoom - 25-100mm Focal Length (35mm equiv.)
H.264 movie recording – 1080p at 30fps
3.0" TFT Color LCD Monitor with 460 000 dots
Pricing: R5 195
Product Link:

Ease of Use: 3.5 / 5

Pricing: 4 / 5

Video Quality: 3 / 5

Photo Quality: 3.5 / 5

Features: 3.5 / 100

Fujifilm seems to be intent on keeping the “Olden Day” alive with their latest range of X-range cameras. This range of cameras look amazing and the controls are general very well thought out. The XF1 is no exception. It’s a good-looking camera with some clever controls. It also feels very solid in your hands. Unfortunately there are still a few features built into the camera that I have to this day not figured out how to use properly. The modes get finicky and it’s not always very clear which mode would suite the current shooting situation the best. With that said though, the camera never felt laggy or slow. In fact, I found it quite snappy.


Working with this camera unfortunately doesn’t feel very intuitive. It’s not terrible, but it kept feeling finicky. Once I got the hang of the camera a bit better, it went easier. The “old school” look for buttons that do modern things is still very cool.

The Fujifilm menu system is not my favourite, but it is mostly functional. There’s some weird navigation here and there, but it’s not too difficult to find your way around and set up the camera the way you want.


Unfortunately the LCD screen isn’t one of the camera’s strong points. Fujifilm seems to have left the LCD technology in the past as well. The DPI is poor, which makes it difficult to see whether a photo is actually sharp or not.

As mentioned before, the camera was quite snappy. Focus and exposure are fast and accurate, even when in video mode and moving around between different surfaces with varying focal points. In video mode the auto focus does come over as being a bit abrupt, but it was smooth and accurate enough for most situations.


The camera also has a surprisingly good macro function. There isn’t any specific setting for it, but the camera didn’t struggle with the close-ups. In fact these came out quite sharp and the focus was quick.

And what do the photos look like?

Well, actually quite good. The results were better than the X100, strangely enough. The photos kept quite a lot of detail intact. Although some artefacting is very visible when zoomed in to 100%, especially in the blurred areas, it doesn’t seem to detract from the image sharpness. This will only become a problem when you would want to print larger than A5/A4 sized prints.

Photos look sharp and the colour rendition is excellent. That has always been one of Fujifilm’s strengths. Photos seemed to handle higher ISO’s better than other Fujiflim cameras I’ve worked with.


Another revelation of this camera was the quality of the video. Finally! Fujifilm seemed to have finally caught up with video quality. For one, the video is now captured in full HD and the quality is actually very decent. It is by no means leading in terms of quality, but it really isn’t terrible. You could definitely work with this footage. The bit-rate, although very low for 1080p footage, seems to come off mostly unscathed in terms of quality. As with the photos, the colours are excellent and the exposure seemed to be very good. Exposure changes are too choppy for my taste though.

As you’d expect, the sound is terrible. But this is a general thing with any camera. You can hear what effect wind has on this camera in the sample video.

All in all, the Fujifilm XF1 is the best Fujifilm camera I’ve worked with in a while. With the “old school” look, ergonomics isn’t at its greatest, but the speed of the camera more than makes up for it. Coupled with nice rendered and sharp images and the best video I’ve seen from any Fujifilm camera I’ve worked with, this is definitely one I’d have a look at.

[yframe url=’http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWubbp1yN_s’]

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