Clown Fatale #4 Review


Main Characters:

Storyline: C

Artwork: B-

This week I decided to pick up a fresh title which happened to be finale issue in the arc. The book I decided to read was none other than Clown Fatale, the deadliest show on Earth!

This comic follows an all-female group of clowns who are mistaken for being assassins. They decide to take the job as contract killers to see where it leads. They decide to keep the clown outfits and make-up on but leave the travelling circus to pursue a new career, one filled with hyper violence. Oh, and for clowns that just happen to be super sexy.

This story seems to be all about girls and gore. For a final issue there is not a lot really happening – no revelations. The monologue style of narration works as Blondie tells her story as she experiences it, so you do get a glimpse into her mind. The problem is there is nothing really on offer. My first feeling when I read this was that it had to be related to Grindhouse as it clearly aims to please with visuals and gory over the top visuals. With this being the closing issue, the story is action packed – Blondie has to deal with a few opponents.

The art is great, but sex clearly aims to sell in this issue as the female protagonists are wearing next to nothing. Entire action scenes featuring multiple fly kicks whilst Blondie is clad in a G-string and a rather tight fit top just screams fan service. This is one heck of a graphic issue with people being charred, decapitated and more. There certainly isn’t a shortage of blood. The dark colours and backgrounds will immediately let you know that this is a twisted sinister read that is not for the kids. And the foul language will back this statement up. One thing that is annoying is the shifting proportions, body shape and size tends to warp at times making the violence look cartoony in some frames. This is just sloppy.

Clown Fatale #4 is far from a good read. Often a good concluding issue will inspire you to obtain the issues that you have missed. Not so much with Clown Fatale. The violence feels forced and the characters are too clichéd.

Written by