BAR Maid #4 Review


Main Characters:

Storyline: C

Artwork: C-

This title tells us the story of a Bar Maid who is working for her Uncle Paddy at what seems like an ordinary bar. But unknown to our protagonist, her Uncle is no regular bar owner; his bar is a safe house for rebel forces fighting against the Japanese in Manchuria.

This issue follows on from the tragic event of Uncle Paddy sacrificing himself in order to save his niece, the protagonist, Cassidy. Cassidy and her friends fled to safety in the woods and were told to find General Lui’s safe house. General Lui was a member of the Chinese Army that had sided with the Japanese invaders in Manchuria. However the General is in fact a defector working for the United States Government. And it is here in his safe house that Cassidy learns the truth about her parents and her uncle.

If you thought it would lead to an exciting revelation, guess again. It is one cliché’ followed by a major cliché in the form of technology’s troublesome time travel device. Yes, as you guessed it, her parents were not church missionaries either. The entire story seems rather average and the dialogue is far from being outstanding as well. Describing a time machine as a “Gobbledygook” is just plain annoying. This story is not gripping or exciting at all. Instead, it does what you expect it to do and looks how you expect it to look.

The art is very bland. In true Zenescope fashion, the women are very curvaceous and… gifted… but unlike other Zenescope titles the female cast is simply not as attractive and this really comes down to poor penciling and bland character design. Faces are very inconsistent and not proportioned properly. Some of the angles are simply not working, especially when it comes to facial expressions. Also each female lead looks like they have been training for war as well. These ladies are ripped and ready, the only problem is that they all have the same body and the only thing that seems to vary here is cup size. Whilst the colouring is good, the penciling leaves much to be desired. The characters look far too similar.

This issue is not as great as Zenescopes other offerings. There are better offerings out there. Titles like Wonderland still incorporate the female sex appeal, however the characters and their art are far stronger than what is offered here. Ironically, this is a title that delves away from the fairytale and fable tradition of Zenescope. It offers something new but ends up being the most cliché.

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