Mr. Morgan’s Last Love Review

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Studio: Kaminski.Stiehm.Film GmbH, Bavaria Pictures, Senator Film
Running Time: 116 mins

Verdict: 2 / 5

Built on Francoise Dorner’s French novel La Douceur Assassine, Michael Caine (Two-time Oscar winner) plays the lead role in Mr. Morgan’s last Love, a May-to-December romance film set in Paris.

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The film is bitter-sweet as it puts the viewer into the shoes of Mr. Morgan, an elderly widower that is mourning the loss of his wife and dealing with the dysfunctional relationship with his adult children. Through the chaos, Mr. Morgan finds friendship and hope again in what seemed to be a lonely world…

French actress Clemence Poesy takes up the character of Pauline, a beautiful young cha cha dance instructor that has a zest for life. She meets Mr. Morgan on a bus and not long after she invites him to a dance class which sparks their unique friendship. The two strike up a friendship as Pauline reminds Mr. Morgan of his dead wife and likewise with Pauline as she believes that Mr. Morgan resembles her dead father.
The two find solace in their father-daughter like friendship, which alters their lives for the better as they find joy and a new meaning to life.

Director Sandra Nettlebeck had a good story to work with, however, it lacks concentration on the narrative. There are too many sub-themes, i.e. the friendship between Pauline and Mr. Morgan, the battle with his children, his fear about losing his wife’s house to his children, trying to find a new hobby through dance in an attempt to get over the death of his wife and lastly Pauline’s relationship with Miles, Mr Morgan’s son (Justin Kirk). This assortment of ideas takes the viewer through too many thought patterns.

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On a good note, the ensemble cast gave an extraordinary performance. Mr. Morgan’s children Karen (Gillian Anderson) and Miles are exactly what the story needed to add context to why he attempted to commit suicide.

The films savior is the beautiful cinematography by Michael Bertl. The beautiful imagery of Paris makes the film look like a love story that you want to be captured in. Unfortunately, the script tells a different story. Overall, the film could have more weight to it and it lacks the consistency of decent storytelling.

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