The Guardians Of The Galaxy In The Comic Books Versus The Movies

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The Guardians Of The Galaxy In The Comic Books Versus The Movies



While the entire world might be going Guardians Of The Galaxy crazy, there is one person who isn’t smiling. It seems comic book creator Steve Englehart is not happy with the way his character, Mantis, was portrayed in Volume 2. Here we take a look at some of the changes James Gunn made to the characters – The Guardians Of The Galaxy in the comic books versus the movies.

“Well, I was not happy with Mantis’ portrayal. That character has nothing to do with Mantis. I will say that I liked the film quite a bit overall, they’re doing good stuff and I enjoyed my night at the movies so long as I turned my brain off to the fact that that’s not Mantis up there. I really don’t know why you would take a character who is as distinctive as Mantis is and do a completely different character and still call her Mantis. That I do not know,” Mantis creator Steve Englehart commented in a recent interview.

While it is common knowledge has taken some liberties with the characters, it seems there are a few people who prefer the unaltered comic book versions of the characters.

Peter Quill

Peter Quill

It seems that the comic book version of Star-Lord isn’t such a big music fan. He didn’t raid ancient planets while listening to Redbone and David Bowie. Quill is also not supposed to be the only human on screen, however, Gunn changed this to make his character more relatable to the audience. He also has a different father, who he knows. In Guardians of the Galaxy #0.1 (2013) by Brian Bendis and Steve McNiven, it was revealed that Peter Quill was the son of an Earth woman and J’Son, King of Spartax. After a brief relationship with Quill’s mom, J’Son returned to the stars. Star-Lord refuses to join his father’s side as the prince of Spartax. His helmet also looks scarier in the comics.

Drax

Drax

While Drax might appear to be one of the funniest characters in the film, in the comics he has a very different personality – he is far more serious. He first appeared in “Iron Man” #55 (1973) by Mike Friedrich and Jim Starlin as the father of a family that was killed by Thanos. His original name was Arthur Douglas, a saxophone-playing real estate agent. In the comics, Drax isn’t so alien. In fact, he is said to have a soul with an Earthly origin. He also has been shown to have healing abilities.

Rocket Raccoon

The Guardians Of The Galaxy In The Comic Books Versus The Movies Rocket Raccoon

While Rocket’s character stays fairly true to the current comic book version (as a loudmouth with a bad temper), he is completely aware that he is a genetically enhanced racoon. Rocket’s ignorance of the word racoon is something added to the film. He also started out as one of several animals who were caretakers of a galactic insane asylum and went by the nickname “Rocky”.

Nebula

Nebula

First appearing in “Avengers” #257 (1985) by Roger Stern and John Buscema, Nebula isn’t really Thanos’ daughter, although she pretends to be. When Thanos found out he uses the Infinity Gauntlet to punish her. Other than that, she is very similar to her comic book character.

Yondu

Yondu

In the comics, Yondu, who was once apart of the Avengers and a leader of the original Guardians of the Galaxy, has a much larger mohawk (similar to the one seen in Volume 2). Also, he is a regular hero and not an anti-hero.

Groot

Groot

Originally appearing as a villain in “Tales to Astonish” #13 (1960) by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, Groot was a very different character to the one you see on screen. The comic book version of the character was far more sinister. At the start of his 2006 reboot, Groot could speak normally. It wasn’t until later that he started only saying “I am Groot”. In the comics, Baby Groot looks less than a child and more like a miniature version of adult Groot.

Mantis

Mantis

Steve Englehart co-created Mantis with artist Don Heck in 1973’s Avengers No. 112. That version of the character was a human, a member of the Avengers, who would later ascend to cosmic awareness and become the “Celestial Madonna,” the mother of a child who was prophesied to be “the most important being in the universe.” She is very different to the Mantis shown in the movie.

Gamora

Gamora

In the comics, Gamora and Iron Man have a brief and steamy relationship. It doesn’t go so well. She “hurts” him. She also has lighter green skin (almost pale) in the comics and wears less clothing.

Kraglin

Kraglin

Kraglin is probably the most different. Kraglin, a purple fur alien, was part of the A-Chiltarians who tried to invade Earth. The comic book version and the film version look nothing alike.

Personally, I think they all work great on screen. Sometimes changing the source material can actually make it more awesome.

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