Beneath the Darkness Review


Cast: , , ,
Age Restriction:
Studio: Raincreek Productions in association with Sunset Pictures
Running Time: 96mins

Verdict: 2.5 / 5

In small towns everyone knows everyone else, but behind closed doors are the darkest secrets…

Beneath The Darkness is actually quite an entertaining movie to watch. It is by no means an A grade thriller, but the dialogue is natural and witty which enables the audience to actually enjoy the interaction between characters, as opposed to spending most of the movie watching them being systematically terrorized.

Ely Vaughn is the aloof and mysterious mortician of a small Texas town. He is noted as a pillar of the community and is well respected by every sensible adult in the town. But Ely Vaughn has a dark and sinister obsession. His secretive persona, and an apparent curiosity with ghosts, attracts the attention of four young friends, Travis (Tony Oller), Abby (Aimee Teegarden), Brian (Stephen Lunsford) and Danny (Devon Werkheiser). The young school goers decide to investigate this eccentric mortician and start snooping around in his house. As a result they discover the gruesome truth behind the dancing shadows, lose a member of their posse to the enraged homeowner, and are drawn into Vaughn’s disturbing world.

If you are an entry level thrill seeker or if you like the buzz of a suspense film but are not sure you can handle the aftereffect of lingering shivers, then this is your kind of flick. There are some rather noticeable cover-ups which one could only attribute to this film having a low budget. Odd overlays of blood that appear to have been added in post-production rather than on set and special effects to represent a ghost that is simply a smoke machine at work hinder the believability of the film. There were also some details in the plot that had no real benefit to the narrative.

Overall, this suspense thriller could easily be reclassified as a sick comedy but it is still worth the watch, even if it is only for the last line of the film or for Quaid’s bizarre sense of humour.

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